Nimbyism, Green Belt Protection and a new, New Local Plan for Castle Point under the Scrutiny of the Intervention Team!

It has been suggested that, in the light of the announcement of the new leader of Castle Point council, that this blog post from July 2017 should be reproduced. It serves as a reminder of what will be expected from a new cpbc Local Plan, and also the expectations of local residents, all under the watchful eye of the Intervention Team.

Encouragingly Castle Point council have again refused permission to develop another Green Belt site.
This time at Catherine Road, Benfleet, where a wooded site had been cleared prior to a proposal for 6 detached houses.
Castle Point, as many will be aware, are without a recognised required 5 Year Housing Supply. At the development committee meeting it was reiterated that the “emerging” local Plan, will include a 5 Year Housing Supply, albeit supported by previously developed Green Belt being released for development. The question of deliverability will be the issue scrutinised by developers and an Inspector.
However, apparently less encouragingly this very week the Telegraph newspaper published a controversial article adding even more pressure from the government on local authorities to supply even more homes than previously expected, in areas such as Castle Point.

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The Telegraph article reads;

“Families living in some of the most sought-after parts of the country will be forced to accept more homes being built near them to tackle the housing crisis, the Communities Secretary has said.
Sajid Javid said that he wants communities which have benefited from soaring property prices to play their part in solving the housing crisis.
New rules to force councils to increase their housing targets will be published in the next three weeks.
Mr Javid’s comments could be seen as a new assault on homeowners with a Nimby” – “Not In My Back Yard” – attitude towards new development. It could also prove controversial with grassroots Tory voters, many of whom live in affluent areas.
But last week, Damian Green, the First Secretary of State, said the Conservative Party had to focus on building affordable homes and creating jobs for “young metropolitan” voters if it wants to expand its support base and win the next general election.
Mr Green suggested that the Conservatives’ defeat (sic) at the general election last month was in part because they had allowed Jeremy Corbyn’s Labour party to seduce younger voters who have struggled to get onto the housing ladder.
Separately, ministers will say on Wednesday that towns and villages across England could get a share of £1billion a year to build bypasses and protect beauty spots from the “misery of lorries and thundering traffic”.
Mr Javid used a speech to council leaders to set out the Government’s plans to deal with the housing crisis and have “a much more frank, open discussion with local residents and communities” about housing.

This means wealthy communities living in areas “where housing is particularly unaffordable” have to accept that more homes needed to be built nearby.
He told council leaders at the Local Government Association’s annual conference: “Nothing is more corrosive to trust than the idea that some areas are being treated better than others.
“Where housing is particularly unaffordable, local leaders need to take a long, hard, honest look to see if they are planning for the right number of homes.
One source at the department said part of the problem was that “you see more active groups locally contesting against decisions” in wealthy areas.
It comes six years after the Government clashed with rural campaigners over plans to make it easier to build on green belt land by relaxing planning laws in favour of developers.
Mr Javid directly criticised Theresa May, the Prime Minister, along with her predecessors in Downing Street, for not doing more to provide enough homes for young families.
He said: “Since the 1970s – under Wilson, Callaghan, Thatcher, Major, Blair, Brown, Cameron and now May – we’ve supplied an average of 160,000 new homes each year. That’s far below what’s needed.”
A new Government consultation paper published this month will provide a “new way for councils to assess their local housing requirements”, Mr Javid said.

Councils are expected to be asked to commission an assessment of how much and what kind of housing is needed in their area. Councils will then use it to inform the housing target in the local plan which sets out where new homes can be built. The target will be reassessed every five years.

The new way of calculating housing need is expected to result in increases of up to 25 per cent in housing forecasts in the Home Counties, campaigners fear.
Mr Javid said: “Our aim is simple: to ensure these plans begin life as they should, with an honest, objective assessment of how much housing is required.
“That means a much more frank, open discussion with local residents and communities.”
The new initiative for more homes would involve “courage to both conceive and execute”, he said: “There will be tough decisions, difficult conversations. But that is what political leadership is about.”
Mr Javid said ministers would ensure that the extra schools, roads and doctors’ surgeries for the new homes would be built.
A spokesman for Mr Javid’s department said: “We want to make sure that local plans are based on an honest assessment of the need for new homes in local authority areas, and are formed in a transparent way that gives communities a strong voice to shape their area.”
Article by Christopher Hope, Chief Political Correspondent 4 July 2017

Photograph, illustrative purposes only.

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One response to “Nimbyism, Green Belt Protection and a new, New Local Plan for Castle Point under the Scrutiny of the Intervention Team!

  1. Steve Sawkins

    Editor
    Clearly the CPBC Housing Options service continues to face significant ongoing pressure. The number of households who approach the service continues to increase, including a significant number from the Thorney Bay Caravan Park, notifying that their tenancy will be coming to an end in the very near future.
    There continues to be a significant shortage of temporary housing stock, now compounded by the continued loss of Thorney Bay caravan dwellings.

    Such stock is required to accommodate benefit reliant individuals and large families affected by the benefit cap, whose homelessness is challenging to prevent due to shortage of affordable/suitable accommodation within both of the private and social rented sector.

    Clearly further work needs to be undertaken to help deal with the issues created by the increasing national demand.

    CPBC have not been clear as to how they intend to deal with this obvious need, with a new leadership statement, that green belt will be protected, only clouding the intervention issue. Previously developed green belt seemly being the answer has not considered viability issues with regards to affordable housing numbers.

    Interestingly there still remains on the planning portal the out line planning permission granted for 600 home at the Thorney Bay site, which still apparently only awaits Sec 106 agreement before commencement and yet Park Homes are being hurriedly erected on the same foot print.

    Will CPBC be able to count granted permission development and park homes on the same site footprint, towards its objectively assessed housing needs?

    Canvey Island has undoubtedly takening the Lion’s share of the Boroughs housing needs, quite simply people want to live there. However I don’t think that even CPBC could get away with using the same development area twice to make up its housing numbers.

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