Tag Archives: Castle Point Council

“Time to burst the myth that all Green Belt is green and use it for the homes our children so desperately need?”

Green Belt is put under further pressure from Housing and Business development by the fashionable approach that an area’s Rural Idyllic Value should become an addition to the existing agreed list of Functions.

A Point is made to support Green Belt being released for development that “over 60 percent is farmland, with herbicides and pesticides pouring air pollution into our cities“. This only proves that using an exaggeration provides a headline rather than gravity to the claim, that the answer to fixing our broken housing market, lies in the Green belt!

Releasing Green Belt isn’t the easy fix, especially where the need for affordable homes is concerned. Indeed quite the opposite, for despite the comparative ease and economics of developing on Green Belt over previously developed areas, levels of affordable housing being provided is low, apparently through viability reasoning!

Of course a Review of Green Belt should be included within a Local Plan process but challenging or undermining of the Green Belt Functions should not be the only test for release.

In the case of Canvey Island, Green Belt, what little that remains, and Green Field land perform far more than the 5 Functions.

Local planners would do well to remember this before it is too late and we have far more to worry about than “pouring pollution” into the urbanised area!

The level of proposed releases of Green Belt is concerning, it will not bring an immediate Fix to the Broken Housing Market. Developers will not build at a rate that would collapse the housing market values!

A balanced approach is required on Housing Supply and Population levels in areas able to support and keep safe current and future residents in appropriate areas. isn’t that what Sustainable Housing should be based on?

Politics of Planning blog posted, 11May 2018:

Labour’s Siobhain McDonagh has called for unused ‘wasteland’ in the Green Belt to be developed. The Member of Parliament for Mitcham and Morden argues that the development of such land would go some way to addressing the housing crisis, whilst preserving genuine areas of natural beauty.

Ms McDonagh is advocating that an extra million new homes be built in London, where 22% of the land within its boundaries is Green Belt, and has made a written submission to the NPPF consultation to this effect. She says that she has found many examples of such land within minutes of train stations across the country.

Commenting on the situation, Ms McDonagh said:
“I have no desire to call for building in our countryside or on the flowing fields of green that we should be so grateful to have. My frustration is not with parks and hills or areas of natural beauty. And of course, I have no intention of calling for housing in areas with environmental protection… There are 128,000 children in England living in temporary accommodation, desperate for a place to call home. In the hearts of our towns and cities, and close to public transport, scrubland, rubbish tips and car washes are inappropriately designated as Green Belt land. It’s time to burst the myth that all Green Belt is green and use it for the homes our children so desperately need. It’s time to grasp the nettle and to stop promising new homes without the means of providing them.”
Siobhain McDonagh said that the idea has support across both parties and amongst a number of thinktanks. Matthew Kilcoyne of the Adam Smith Institute agrees with Ms McDonagh, and believes that there is a common romantic misconception over the true nature of the Green Belt. He commented:
“Far from rolling hills and daisy strewn meadows, the Green Belt is anything but a rural idyll. Over 60 percent is farmland, with herbicides and pesticides pouring air pollution into our cities.”

Siobhain McDonagh’s intervention came in the same week as the National Planning Summit, held on 10 May in London. Her opinions are in step with Christine Whitehead of the Government’s Build-out Review Panel – the Letwin Review – who told the Summit that a “very large proportion” of the problem of why planning permissions fail to be built out is an over-reliance on large housing sites. Ms Whitehead added that “between 2008 and 2014, over 50% of permissions were on large sites, and five per cent of the output was on large sites.”

Ms McDonagh’s idea would certainly free up many small sites within London, and it will be interesting to see whether this issue is considered by the Letwin Review, which is due to be published before the Autumn Budget in November 2018.

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Castle Point Council face Testicular Examination Ahead! Whilst Nuneaton Council act as Local Plan Pathfinders?

Having promised to stand firm over Infrastructure before more Housing, the new Castle Point Borough Council regime will now have their resolve fully tested by the Government’s team sent into the Borough to oversee progress on the Local Plan.

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Residents, having shown confidence in the Lead group of councillors by giving them an increased majority at the May 2018 local elections, will be expecting them to be able to revive the latest withdrawn Local Plan following 12 months of intensive and “tireless” Duty to Cooperate work following the Examination inspector’s criticisms.

The protection of Green Belt was paramount to Residents concerns, and any backing away from the local authorities position will be open to criticism!

This may be particularly so in the light of promises to overturn the Borough Plan made in another area, Nuneaton, where the successful Conservative group promised to:

“Protect existing communities and deliver the roads, health and school services we need.
 Reduce the housing numbers based on new government guideline figures.
 Withdraw from Labour’s secret agreement to take Coventry’s overspill.” 

“Distribute housing more fairly around the Borough to enhance not destroy existing communities.”
 “Ensure our communities finally receive the much needed road improvements, schools, GPs, shops and essential facilities they deserve, 
 Prioritise Brownfield sites first, protecting our existing communities by removing unsuitable and unsustainable sites from Labour’s broken Borough plan.”

Andrew Lainton, of Decisions Decisions, Decisions blog suggests:

“However the Borough Plan is mid examination with initial findings due to be published this month.

As the inspectors findings are binding the only alternative to fulfill the manifesto would be to withdraw the local plan.

This would put the Council in special measures.” 

The Nuneaton Tory Group’s reference to Unsuitable and Unsustainable sites is interesting and should, but doubtfully will, provoke examination at Castle Point.

The wholesale blanket application of the Sequential Test across Canvey Island would, elsewhere, be expected to be deemed Unsustainable.

In effect despite being a flood Zone 3a, any Housing Development proposed for Canvey Island is deemed appropriate!

This is evidenced in each and every Application paperwork by officers, following councillors instruction, having “persuaded” the Environment Agency that Canvey Island is a Special Case!

An illustration of this, taken from the cpbc Annual Monitoring Report 2016-17 states; “It should be noted that there is no specific policy on flood risk included within the Local Plan (1998 adopted version) and therefore the Council relies on national policy set out in the National Planning Policy Framework and its technical guidance in respect of such matters.

Of course since then the Strategic Flood Risk Assessment has recognised that Canvey Island is at Actual Risk of Tidal Flooding and the Integrated Urban Drainage Study was researched and published following the 2014 Summer Flooding of Canvey Island!

Castle Point councillors, those involved on the development committee at least, appear willing to accept responsibility for future Flooding of housing and danger to residents, whether from Surface Water or Tidal.

So far that has paid handsomely. Over time and following Flood events, that may prove less so, as Housing built since the 1st January 2009 is not eligible for the Flood Re Insurance Protection that makes available affordable insurance.

Should this problem emerge mortgages on “new” builds may well be denied due to insurance issues. New Canvey Island House Buyers may well be walking into this trap unaware.

The development of Canvey Island both Industrial and Housing continues unabated, this will intensify the pressures on the already broken drainage system, and road and health service infrastructures.

The cpbc Annual Monitoring Report also states, “the proportion of new homes provided on previously developed land to remain lower than in earlier years.”

and that, even more worryingly; 

“16 affordable housing units were delivered in Castle Point in 2016/17, representing 14% of total housing provision (114 dwellings). This level of provision is an improvement on the annual average provision for the period 2001 to 2016 of 11.5%,”

An example of the inadequacy of our local authority is illustrated within the cpbc Sequential test documentation to support the first of the local plans, the Core Strategy, in which it was admitted “The Environment Agency met with the Council in 2007 to identify criteria under which they would allow development to proceed on Canvey Island. The final criterion was the need to ensure that the Emergency Planners and Emergency Services were satisfied with the measures in place to ensure safety in the event of a flood.

These services had not been consulted in the preparation of PPS25, and as such this requirement was a surprise to them, for which they were not prepared.

A typical approach by developers to overcome the Constraint on Housing by Flood Risk on Canvey Island and acceptable to CPBC is demonstrated here;

  • “The application site is located on Canvey Island, which is situated entirely within Flood Risk Zone 3a,
  • The Council has undertaken an annual review of Strategic Housing Land Availability (SHLAA) since 2011. This process has consistently indicated the need for a greater supply of housing land to meet the objectively assessed housing needs of the borough.
  • When applying a sequential test it is important to have regard to the local context. Canvey Island is a distinctive community, accommodating 43% of the borough’s population. It has specific identified needs in terms of social, economic and physical regeneration, as well as housing.
  • In order for residential development to serve the community of Canvey Island it is considered that it needs to be located within that settlement.”

The Level of delivery of Affordable Housing and the continued influx of new Residents from outside of the Area onto Canvey Island suggest that “residential development to serve the community of Canvey Island” is simply too broad a sweeping statement intended to be a means of simply granting Planning Permission to bolster the BOROUGH’s Housing Supply in an Unsuitable Location!

It would appear unusual, if not unreasonable, for a local authority to seek to increase the Urban Density by developing Green field land and intensifying Brownfield development,  supposedly under the guise of satisfying the Need of the Canvey Island Community, when in effect it simply intensifies Inward Migration, in an area specifically under the threat of both Tidal and Surface Water Flood Risk!

We eagerly look forward to learn what Resolve, Metal, Determination and hopefully Fairness, the new administration at Castle Point council are able to apply to the ongoing Local Plan process in the shadow of Government Intervention!

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Like a bad Smell, this just will not Go Away!

The full Decisions Decisions, Decisions post may be read HERE.

Canvey New Access Road, and the Promised Yachting Marina just a Dream! Any wonder Islanders take a Pinch of Salt with the Promises?

It is usual prior to Elections that Canvey Island residents are subject to certain infrastructure Promises from Castle Point Lead Group representatives.

This year has been slightly different in that Little, if Anything, has been raised about the proposed new access road to Canvey Island, via the Manor way to the promised land that is Thurrock!

Waterside Farm

Waterside Roundabout – Unusually clear!

Even though the Leader cllr Riley did touch upon no Housing prior to improved Infrastructure in an Echo interview, this was under the duress of imminent Government Intervention in the Castle Point Local Plan process.

More Telling with respect of Road Infrastructure and new Access to Canvey Island is contained in a personal response from Essex County Council (ECC) regarding unadopted Roads.
The ECC made perfectly clear the dire straits they feel they are in where finance for Highways is concerned.

It appears that even if Government finances were made available to construct a new Canvey Island Access Road, ECC may well be extremely reluctant to go ahead with the road’s construction, due to it being their responsibility to maintain!

Essex County council wrote;
“we have limited funds available to maintain those areas for which we actually are responsible.”

Canvey Island Residents should really be far more sceptical where promises from both Essex County Council AND Castle Point Council are concerned.

We, the Canvey Green Belt Campaign were subjected to fanciful promises from no less than a team headed by the Castle Point Chief Executive and two Senior “professional” Officers, when it was arranged for us to meet following our successful Referendum on protecting Canvey Island’s Green Belt in the summer of 2009.

Having made clear to the cpbc representatives that, by a 99%+ majority, Canvey Residents were concerned over the cpbc plans to develop Housing on the Island’s few remaining patches of Green Belt, we were treated to a presentation of the proposed RSPB site on Canvey West Marsh and then an attempted engagement over the planned redevelopment of the Town Centre!

This we had to rudely interrupt the meeting over as they were distracting asides, only to then hear of cpbc’s intentions to convert the OIKOS hazardous Industrial site – into a Yachting Marina !!!

“The Council has a long‐term ambition to see operations at the Hazardous Installations at South Canvey cease, improving the safety of existing and future residents living on Canvey Island.”

“With regard to the deliverability of this ambition, the council’s Policy CP9 is a long term policy which looks beyond 2020 to a time when dependence on gas imports and fossil fuels in general is significantly reducing.”

The levels of intelligence that Castle Point Council credit Canvey Islanders with is woefully inadequate and insulting.

It is undoubtedly this arrogance that has taken cpbc to the threshold of Government Intervention following 3 attempted publications of a Local Plan, each ignominiously either forced into Withdrawal or Rejection, further endangering the Borough’s Green Belt and increasing the levels of population at Risk of Flooding or Industrial Accident.

Update.

Since this Post was published, an election leaflet has been delivered from the controlling group. 

It states that “Plans for the final stage of Roscommon Way are in progress.” and our MP and her colleagues “are demanding Government funds the third access road”.

Photograph Courtesy: Echo Newspaper and Google 

Canvey Comes Alive! Is this a case of CPBC Cutting off our Nose to Spite our Face?

News that work is pressing ahead with Canvey Island’s new Retail development adjacent to Morrisons Supermarket is given an interesting and speculative “Spin” by the developers.

“The new retail park will complement the existing town centre and create a more convenient local shopping destination for Canvey Island residents and visitors, encouraging footfall into the town centre.

NewRiver’s investment, it says, will act as a catalyst for further growth and long-overdue investment for the whole town, whilst providing approximately 150 new jobs, excluding construction related employment.
Jamie Whitfield, director at NewRiver, said: “This is a significant step in an exciting and long-overdue development for the Canvey Island community.

NewRiver’s plans to transform and re-activate this brownfield site into a new retail park will offer greater choice that will allow local people to shop locally in Canvey as well as attracting shoppers from other parts of Essex.”

Given that Retail businesses are suffering through the Internet, Austerity and high Rates and Rents, it is hard to imagine how, what is an “out of town” Retail area offering convenience foods and cut price goods, will complement Canvey island’s Town Centre!

Following the abandonment of the Town Centre Regeneration, promising “Canvey Comes Alive”, this could amount to the death knell for many town centre outlets.

Identifying the venture as “reactivating this brownfield site” also amounts to  oversell as the site was Green Field!

Whilst the promise of 150 new jobs is welcomed the news of the venture being a “catalyst for further growth and long-overdue investment for the whole town” once again questions Cllr Riley’s promise of no Development before Infrastructure delivery!

Once again the disregard by Castle Point council of their Local Plan supporting Documentation, this time the Retail Assessment, in which it clearly recognises the Need for Retail and Employment development in the Mainland part of the Borough, indicates the planners and members lack of ability in Growth Distribution matters, that has brought Intervention to the Runnymede council offices doorstep!

Once again Politics prevails!

Still if the new venture was to fail, the Brownfield site could soon be proposed as a large Housing development.

The Full Article can be found via this LINK.

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Photo Courtesy: canveycomesalive

The Paddocks, public meeting Rejected now out to Consultation. Every scrap of Canvey Brownfield available for Development!

A step back to assess the bigger picture may be wise.

Paddocks

The Paddocks community centre, Canvey Island

The Adopted 1998 Local Plan has a blanket no development of Green Belt in the Borough, whilst any later emerging Local Plan has been attacked for proposing various levels of Green Belt development.

Government apparently supports Green Belt reviews through Local Plan processes and if not enough Brownfield sites are available to meet projected Housing Needs for an area, evidence and arguments will be considered over the release of Green Belt for release and development.

Castle Point is likely to not have enough Brownfield sites to meet its Housing Need.

It therefore follows that those in Control of forming Policy and drawing a Local Plan for Castle Point would fall back on existing policies, fending off at the 11th Hour government Intervention in the cpbc Local Plan, developing out all Brownfield Land in an attempt to meet Housing Need, whilst being seen to be proactive in following Government guidance in the case of the Paddocks would include considering releasing its own Local Authority land for development.

Government Press release April 2017
Councils will have new tools to speed up development of derelict and underused land for new homes.

Councils will have new tools to speed up development of derelict and underused land for new homes, Housing and Planning Minister Gavin Barwell confirmed today (3 April 2017).

Local authorities across the country will now have to produce and maintain up-to-date, publicly available registers of brownfield sites available for housing locally.

The new registers will help housebuilders identify suitable brownfield sites quickly, promising to unlock land for thousands of new homes.

Communities will be able to highlight local derelict or underused building sites that are primed for redevelopment. This can bring investment to the area and increase the number of new homes in the area.

As set out in the recently published Housing White Paper, the registers are part of the government’s ambitious programme to speed up house building, promote brownfield sites for development and release land to deliver many more new homes.

Housing and Planning Minister Gavin Barwell said:

We need to build more homes in this country so making sure that we re-use brownfield land is crucial. We want to bring life back to abandoned sites, create thousands more homes and help protect our valued countryside.

These new registers will give local authorities and developers the tools to do this.

In addition, the £3 billion Home Builders Fund will be used to support the development of brownfield sites, with an additional £1.2 billion provided to unlock at least 30,000 Starter Homes on brownfield land.”

The promise of replacing the old Paddocks building with a brand New smaller Facility, was expected to act as  a sweetener, to the 30+ Houses on site that are purported to finance the project.

Whether the viability of the scheme has been tested fully, we shall eventually see.

A public meeting for Canvey residents has been, whilst it must be remembered that Borough finances will be affected, and in place a Consultation is expected.

Now with May elections approaching “outsiders” are having their say through social media on what is basically a Canvey matter.

Canvey and mainland residents should though be ready to consider whether different standards are applied to different areas across the Borough.

For reflection we include the Echo coverage on a Hadleigh site from January 2014, whilst acknowledging that no two cases are alike.

Will the cpbc promised Paddocks Consultation, rather than a public meeting, be worth the Council Meeting minutes paper it is written on.

Read the following Echo report from 2014, including councillors Smith and Isaacs reassuring words, then You Decide!

Hadleigh Hall and the WRVS Hall in John H Burrows Recreational Ground could be torn down

DRAWINGS of multi-million pound plans to completely remodel a Hadleigh park have been revealed to the public.

Hadleigh Hall and the WRVS Hall in John H Burrows Recreational Ground, in Rectory Road, could be torn down as part of Castle Point Council’s plans to revitalise the rundown site.

The council has revealed the plans will cost £3 million and will go out to consultation.

Proposals include a new family-friendly restaurant and pub by Greene King, a community venue, sports pavilion, multi-use games area, outdoor exercise equipment as well as provisions for basketball, tennis and skateboarding.

There will also be campus-wide CCTV and 24-7 security on 1.14-acre site.

Norman Smith, Conservative councillor responsible for economic growth and business liaison, said: “We asked the regeneration partnership to go out and obtain interest in that particular site as we have a derelict hall full of asbestos and another which has come to the end of its useful life.

“It is also widely used by various groups for cricket, football and the children’s play area.

“But at the moment it only caters to the very young and older residents where members would like facilities for all age groups.

“We have had interest but some parties couldn’t deliver what we wanted.

“I do not want this to be seen as a done deal. We want the public to look at it and come back with recommendations for us to evaluate.”

Under the plans the existing Hadleigh Bowls Club, Hadleigh and Thundersley Cricket Club, children’s playground and Solby House will remain although the tennis courts will be moved elsewhere on the site.

Greene King has offered to give £750,000 to the project.

The council hopes to gain the additional cash from Veolia Pitsea Marshes Trust and Sport England.

However, Godfrey Isaacs, Conservative councillor for St James’ ward, said he had been inundated with emails from residents concerned about a new pub coming to the park.

Mr Isaacs said: “The information given out to the public was for commercial use and at that stage I envisaged a restaurant similar to the one in Chalkwell Park rather than a public house.

“Four public houses in Hadleigh have closed in the last 10 years and none of these were in a sports field.

“We have two halls there that are beyond their sell by date that need to be repaired or replaced but not to the detriment of facilities already there.

“This consultation needs to be thorough and borough wide, wide enough so that people can make their feelings known.

We do not want just a two week consultation that will just see it rubber stamped.”

Anything to add, feel free to Comment!

 

Castle Point Local Plan Mk 5, written by Basildon and Essex Councils, will Leave us Far Worse off than being “Hung Out to Dry”!

The Nasty Intervention men from the Ministry are due to visit Castle Point Council this week!

Just to avoid any accusations that we are misleading you, we reproduce faithfully the wording in the Secretary of State Sajid Javid’s letter to cllr C.Riley

“My officials will also begin formal discussions on the options of inviting Essex County Council to prepare a Local Plan for Castle Point and with the neighbouring authorities on the possibility of directing an accelerated Joint Plan”

From this single sentence it is clear to assume that “Houston, we have a Problem!”

Untitled

Of course it would have been helpful and in the interests of Openness and Transparency, something that cpbc should be looking to emulate, to have seen exactly what Cllr Riley and the cpbc chief executive wrote in response to Sajid Javid’s threat of Intervention in our Local Plan process.

But it appears you will remain none the wiser!

Rushing-through a Local Plan is something that Basildon Council consider themselves adept at.

The “driver” in their move to adopt their own Local Plan at the recent council meeting, coincidently just a couple of days ahead of the Government’s Intervention letters being distributed to the 15 local authorities concerned, was, as expressed by a Basildon Senior Planning Official;

it is clearly expressed that the unmet need of neighbouring authorities should also be taken into account when setting the housing target.

This is relevant given that Southend-on-Sea and Castle Point (within out housing market area) experience quite significant physical constraints and are unlikely to be able to meet their housing target without breaching rules around flood risk and/or nature conservation – ie. 20,480 would be the least Basildon would be expected to deliver.”

Quick, Pull up the Drawbridge!

Although we can expect Basildon to be found out by their Examining Inspector if they haven’t specific proof that they have considered thoroughly Southend and Castle Point’s request for them to consider taking some of Castle Point’s constrained housing shortfall, assuming a request was made!

The thought that Essex County Council will also get involved in our Local Plan, when they view the Road Infrastructure on Canvey Island and the mainland as being acceptable is frightening to say the least.

ECC would likely support the Jotmans Farm proposal in the knowledge that the transport survey reveals;

“4.4 Site H14 – Land West of Benfleet:
By way of summary, the following key findings can be reported with regard to the appraisal of a potential link road between Benfleet and the A130 Canvey Way, as reported in this chapter:

The operation of the Sadlers Farm junction (Junction 1) is predicted to be comparable, in either scenario without or with the link road, with the results reported within the ‘amber’ range in all cases. When considered in further detail however, slight improvements to the operation of the junction are expected with the introduction of the link road, in both the AM and PM peak hours (although the results would remain in the ‘amber’ range);

The operation of the Tarpots junction (Junction 8) is predicted to be very similar, in either scenario without or with the link road, with the results reported within the ‘red’ range in all cases. Whilst in overall terms, a change in performance is not expected, improvements are predicted to occur at the junction for vehicles turning left from the B1006 onto the A13 and for vehicles turning right from the A13 onto the B1006;

The proposed roundabout junction on the A130 Canvey Way (Junction 21) is predicted to operate within its capacity threshold, within the ‘green’ range of results, allowing for its implementation with the link road. Further work to cost and design the link road and junction will be required, should this scheme be promoted further; and,

The junctions of Wavertree Road (Junction 22) and Jotmans Lane (Junction 23) are predicted to operare (sic) within their capacity thresholds, within the ‘green’ range of results, allowing for the implementation of the link road. Further design work will be required to consider how these existing junctions, and the roads they serve, should be treated with regard to their integration with any link road in this area should it be promoted further “ *

No mention of the backing up of Traffic onto Waterside Roundabout and across Canvey Island this new junction on Canvey Way will cause!

The assessment of highway access to the Blinking Owl site drew negative scoring;

“To support the full development therefore, one or more other access points would need to be put in place, which would be expected to require significant highway works and amendments to the existing network.”

Significant Highways works are not something Essex County Council appear eager to spend money on in our part of the County, despite the site appearing to be able to yield 2,000 plus dwellings!

Our County Authority deem the partial upgrade of the Fairglen InterchangeA127 / A130 as a major investment programme, albeit a partial scheme.

This junction typifies the short-termism and cost saving highway infrastructure schemes developed in this Country!

“ Essex County Council has carried out extensive survey work at the Interchange. In summary this shows”;
“• High levels of congestion • Three major roads joining at one location leading to traffic conflict”
“Current traffic flow data shows that the A130 arm from the north of the Interchange has reached its maximum capacity. All other arms of the roundabouts of the Interchange are close to capacity. Highest traffic flows are recorded on the A127 westbound in the morning peak and eastbound in the evening peak. This also results in congestion in the links between the roundabouts at the Interchange.”

And they (Essex County Council) propose? “Short term improvements”!

As far as Essex CC are concerned Somnes Avenue, Canvey Island was recognised as possibly benefitting from a proposed widening scheme, although it appears the cycle lane was of more importance, and the Woodmans Arms, Rayleigh Road, Thundersley is in need of an improved flow scheme!

It is of No Surprise then to have heard cllr Bill Dick when referring to the Hadleigh Regeneration Scheme and the redevelopment of the Library building, say that he considered Essex County Council had “Hung Castle Point Out to Dry”, where funding was concerned!

Castle Point Local Plan, in the hands of Basildon Council and Essex County Council would be a disaster in the Making, for our Borough!

For the Record, from the contact we have had, and the observations of them in carrying out their workload, we have found Planning Inspectors to be very fair minded. However they have made clear that their job is not to allocate development sites, only that local authorities have been reasonably fair and correct in their site selection process.

This has NOT always been the case in the previous versions of Local Plan’s by Castle Point council!

* AECOM Transport Evidence for the New Local Plan Phase 2 November 2015

CPBC Peer Challenge “Positives,” Yet to include being “Upfront about its strategic growth” and being Receptive to Growth within the Green Belt!

“I would encourage everyone to read the report”

ceo Castle Point Borough Council 

The invite could not be resisted, however the “Positives” in the cpbc Peer Challenge  Report, appear to be more difficult to find.

Yes the Budget controls are seen as a “Positive” in these austere times, as does the performance from the somewhat reduced staffing levels.

Essex FRS

In this 3rd look into the Peer Report, we highlight another area in which this “Positive” report appears not so rosy.

If this section of the Peer Review does not cause concern as to where CPBC is heading then nothing will:

” 4.2 Leadership of Place

Many senior internal and external partners provided clear evidence of CPBC’s strong leadership and commitment to South Essex Vision 2050.

This positive approach must continue to ensure the work is strategic and proactive.
Partners proposed a number of issues to strengthen that leadership and commitment further and asked CPBC to:

Be upfront about its strategic growth – CPBC needs to demonstrate that it is fully considering all potential growth options and with partners be planning for accommodating its fair share.

Be receptive to some plan led growth in the green belt. As part of the South Essex 2050 work, all of the partner Councils will need to consider the potential for growth within their green belt.

For CPBC, where possible, it will need to illustrate that such growth can be achieved even if only on a small scale as part of the wider growth agenda.

Effective partnerships require ‘give and take’ and we saw that the Council’s leadership were receptive to this.” 

We all need to wake up to what is going on here!