Tag Archives: Flooding

Canvey Island’s “flood” of Good News stories!

Never let it be said that the Canvey Green Belt Campaign group dwell on “poor us” missives as we acknowledge, the flood of Canvey Island  “Good News Stories,” being brought to our attention across social media of late. We are more than happy to contribute and post the following Hoorahs!

Those residents troubled should we see a Rain Storm in future similar to those of 2013 and 2014 can rest assured.

They will know that their Homes now have access to the FLOOD Re insurance scheme. This scheme insures they will be able to get competitive House Insurance from practically the whole insurance market.

Provided their homes were built prior to 2009!

In 2015 Castle Point Council assembled a high profile delegation and attended Parliament seeking £24,500,000 so as to upgrade the Canvey Island drainage system and to prevent any further flooding of Canvey Homes.

We have no further update on the request by Parliament to provide breakdown figures of exactly what the money is required for.

We also must pay tribute to the tireless and determined efforts that MAP, the Multi Agency Partnership, of the Environment Agency, Anglian Water, Essex County Council, Castle Point Council and Essex Highways are making to keep our Island Homes dry and Residents safe in the event of a future storm capable of bringing Surface Water Flooding.

It can ONLY, therefore be a short matter of time before scheduled routine maintenance of the Hole Haven Sluice is carried out.

Sluice 4Sluice 3Sluice 2

Sluice 1

 

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Canvey Island Residents left Bamboozled by Flood Protection Funding Maze!

The flooding of Canvey Island during the summers of 2013 and 2014 and the ongoing concerns of a repeat event have been the subject of recent local news reports and social media posts.

A recent visit was carried out by the Government under Secretary of State for the Environment, Thérèse Coffey MP to meet a delegation of CPBC councillors and officers and representatives of the multi agency partnership to view the work carried out so far in response to the 2014 flooding.

Press reports suggested that time was spent observing the achievements rather than viewing areas of the Island’s drainage scheme that remained to be upgraded.

For instance, Essex Highways have accounted for a promised routine improvement of Canvey’s road gully maintenance, whereas in fact certain roads gullies on the Island have not received any cleansing for a number of years! And yet apparently huge sums of central funding has been claimed by ECC, whilst routine work is neglected.

Essex Highways claim, “that (they) have shown its commitment by investing more than £1 million of additional funding to help tackle localised problems such as blocked gullies”, appears to have gone unchallenged by cpbc representatives, whilst they should be fully aware that regular routine maintenance is not carried out, except perhaps in those areas that were previously reported flooded.

The implication in this case being, prevention is not better than cure!

It cannot be denied that keeping the profile high on the amount of work needed to upgrade Canvey’s drainage system is a very good thing, but the release of central funding must be used on tangible works.

Canvey residents, whose properties suffered from the flooding during 2014 have been urged to make a claim for a grant towards installing Flood Prevention measures.

This encouragement to claim by council officials, appears to indicate a concession that future flood events may well occur, despite the work carried out so far, or that the maintenance programme and upgrading of the drainage system, reliant on the £24,000,000 grant from Government, may well not be forthcoming.

However, the ease of residents seeking access to funding for the installation of flood prevention measures appears not so easy to locate, despite the encouragement from local representatives.

A visit to our local authority’s website seeking residents funding reveals only;

Castle Point Council

“Council Tax Discount for properties affected by flooding on 20th July 2014. Deadline Extended to 30.11.2014”

Using a little initiative a search for and read of the famous 6 Point Plan reveals a lead;

“Following detailed investigations, the group envisages this scheme benefiting around 15,000 high risk properties – or around 40,000 residents – on the Island. It is estimated that these measures will require an additional £500,000 of allocated funding to support the PLP package, which was introduced in September of this year. This scheme will continue to be run and managed by Essex County Council in their role as Lead Local Flood Authority (LLFA).”

The impliction being all properties on Canvey are subject to some level of surface water flood risk.

This led us to then log onto the ECC website where upon, using a couple of search words the following was discovered, an application area for qualifying residents of the whole  of Essex, not just Canvey Island, to claim for flood prevention measures. Disappointingly the situation is not as rosy as some, having suffered flooding, may have wished;

Essex County Council

“Please note: Due to the high number of applications, we’re currently unable to confirm if your application will be successful.

We will notify you as soon as the status of your application changes.”

It is a concern that an element of transparency regarding whether some of this may be old or new money being granted and whether grants are being used in central budgets, as we know of the multi agency partnership Essex Highways for one, are over stating their commitment!

The Castle Point Conservatives post on social media from the MPs and delegates meeting reads;

Thérèse Coffey MP, the Parliamentary under Secretary of State for the Environment, visited Castle Point at the request of local MP Rebecca Harris. The Minister was invited to see the joint work that Essex County Council, Anglian Water, the Environment Agency and Castle Point Borough Council have undertaken to reduce the risk of future flooding and hear what progress has been made on the Six Point Plan Proposal.

Canvey Island was especially badly flooded in the summers of 2013 and 2014 and in the aftermath of the flooding a Multi-Agency Partnership (MAP) was formed between Essex County Council, Anglian Water, The Environment Agency and Castle Point Borough Council to prevent future flooding. The MAP created a 6 Point Plan setting out actions that the agencies could undertake to increase resilience to surface water flooding. The Plan includes: property level flood protection; dredging Canvey Lake; Increasing capacity of the drainage infrastructure by building an Integrated Urban Drainage Model for Canvey; create the Canvey Resilient Communities Programme; development of innovative flood management technologies and investment in green surface water storage.

During the visit the Environment Agency’s Eastern Region Deputy Director, Charles Beardall, and Anglian Water’s Head of Flood Risk Management, Jonathan Glerum, explained to the Minister the work done so far on the Integrated Urban Drainage model and the significant investment made into the various pumping stations around the Island and on the Benfleet Creek Barrier.

The Minister also visited Canvey Lake where Castle Point Borough Council’s CEO, David Marchant, and Essex County Council’s Head of Environment and Flood Management, John Meehan, updated the Minister on the progress made on the 6 Point Plan to date. They also touched on future challenges facing the MAP.

Following the visit, Environment Minister Thérèse Coffey MP said “Protecting people from flooding is an absolute priority, which is why we are spending more than £1 million to refurbish floodgates and on work investigating new local defences on Canvey Island.

“I was delighted to see first-hand what’s being done on the ground to better protect the community and will continue to follow the work with interest.”

Commenting, Castle Point MP Rebecca Harris said “I would like to thank the Minister for taking the time out of her busy schedule to visit Castle Point. We have made real progress to ensure that residents don’t suffer the terrible flooding of 2014 again and I am pleased that the Minister had the chance to see the progress first hand. There is still however more to do and I will be making sure that the County Council, Borough Council, Anglian Water and Environment Agency continue to work well together.

Cllr Ian Grundy, Essex County Council Cabinet Member for Highways, said “Essex County Council is proud to be part of the Multi-Agency Task Group which works to reduce the flood risk in Canvey. Friday’s visit from MP Thérèse Coffey offered a welcome opportunity to increase awareness of the key challenges we all face and how we are working collaboratively to find solutions.

“Since the task group was formed in 2014/15, Essex Highways has shown its commitment by investing more than £1 million of additional funding to help tackle localised problems such as blocked gullies and defective pipework in Canvey. We are also investing a further £500,000 over the next two years to address broader drainage issues. Our colleagues in Flood Management have invested £600,000 and will have protected 100 properties as part of their Property Protection scheme and have done numerous floods studies to target our future investments

“Essex Highways and the Flood Management team pride themselves on being innovative in their approach to deliver more, for less, for the taxpayer. We will continue to be a keen contributor to the work of the Multi-Agency Task Group, with a focus on delivering greener, more sustainable solutions to help solve these issues.” “

Jonathan Glerum, Anglian Water’s Head of Flood Risk Management, said “We were delighted to welcome the Minister to Canvey and show her the great partnership work that has been delivered. The approach to multi-agency working that has been developed on Canvey is a game changer and has delivered significant investment in flood mitigation on the island.”

“Anglian Water has invested over £2million on improvements to our drainage network on the Island and is committed to continued working with partners, and Government, as we look to develop and deliver innovation solutions to flood risk management for Canvey.”

Environment Agency’s Eastern Region Deputy Director, Charles Beardall, said “The day was a great opportunity to highlight the scale of the Environment Agency’s investment on Canvey, from our ongoing maintenance work to significant improvements to the protection of properties from main river flooding. It also gave us a chance to showcase our work with partner organisations as they look at future options to reduce surface water flood risk.”

Castle Point Borough CEO, David Marchant, said “All of the agencies involved were able to demonstrate to the Minister how much progress they have made since the disastrous flooding of 2013/14. Working together we have invested or plan to invest nearly £6m in accordance with the Six Point Plan to ensure the existing network operates as effectively as possible. However there is still more to do but the unique nature of the drainage system means that innovation in design is necessary particularly when the essential balance between the environment and critical drainage infrastructure on Canvey Lake has to be maintained.”

Canvey Councillor Ray Howard MBE, Castle Point Borough Council’s Cabinet Member for Waste and Flooding, said ‘It was very encouraging to have a Minister of the Crown visit Canvey Island. The Minister showed a great interest in our previous flooding problems and assured us that her department would do all they could to assist in future flooding matters’.

One thing appears absolutely clear is that despite some claims to the contrary, the possibility of a repeat of the devastating events is now accepted by many agency representatives!

Continued Development Necessary, for Canvey Island to Thrive Economically and Socially, despite the Hazards!

Is there a point where it becomes inconsiderate, down right fool-hardy or plain morally wrong, to Plan to continually increase the population of Canvey Island?

Or have we already reached the stage where Castle Point Council’s policies have left the Island over populated?

Currently the policy of Castle Point Council is clear, it intends to continue to develop Housing and Business properties on the Island as a necessity as, “it is considered that continued development is necessary in order that the settlement of Canvey can continue to thrive economically and socially.”

Canvey Island, as all residents, prospective and current, should know, is at Actual Risk of Tidal Flooding, suffers from Surface Water Flooding and is home to 2 Top Tier COMAH sites, Oikos and Calor.

In addition to this OIKOS have permission to expand its facilities having had this proposal approved; Construction of a new deep water jetty facility consisting of the refurbishment of and extension to the existing OSL Jetty, refurbishment of an existing 12 tank storage compound and the undertaking of related operational and site infrastructure works.

Calor currently have gas import facility via its own jetty.

Entry and Exit of Canvey Island is possible from just one point, Waterside Farm Roundabout.

Should there be an incident of any type the Council wish Residents, in the first instance, to Shelter.

Sheltering, “is normally the preferred option. This involves residents being asked to stay in their homes, close all doors and windows, tune into local media sources and await further instructions, or the all clear from the emergency services.

The evacuation of residents is normally a last resort, however should the emergency pose a significant risk, then it may be the only viable option.”

So before any reader gets too carried away with us being Scare-mongerers, the possibility of an incident that may require Evacuation of the Island exists and cpbc recognise it!

However the only examination , albeit some years ago, into the logistics of an Evacuation found that the timescale could involve taking over 19 hours! This was prior to the introduction of Traffic Lights at Sadlers Farm Roundabout and the increase in population recorded in the 2011 Census!

It must be assumed that the 19 hours estimated would have been for an orderly evacuation exercise.

In practise the Summer Floods of 2014 gave a clear indication of the capacity of the Escape Routes. In particular Canvey Way became blocked, as per usual. This in turn actually stopped the Emergency Services, in this case the Environment Agency, from attending the Drainage Pumps that were either malfunctioning or had lost electrical power!

The Environment Agency reported to ECC “The flood water on the Island made conditions difficult for our engineers to move between pumping stations, this in turn made the response to the ongoing problems at the pumping stations more challenging.”

Essex County Council concluded;

” As such, the impact on flood risk of any new proposals for development (on Canvey Island) or alterations to permeable land, for example the paving of gardens, needs to be considered very carefully and impermeable surfaces avoided where possible. .”

Many moons ago our local authority made an effort to communicate to each household, measures to be taken by Residents should a Flood occur, this has long since ceased!

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The 2005 Buncefield incident is relative to Canvey Island. Canvey’s 2 Hazardous Industrial Sites in liaison with Essex County Council have their own Emergency Plans. That  only certain limited information is shared with just the absolute closest of neighbouring residents, highlights the lack of Preparedness of the vast majority of Islanders. The potential for the whole of Canvey to be badly affected by an “accident” at either Hazardous Site exists.

The Hertford Police updated Buncefield Residents;

“Whilst this operation is ongoing there will be increased settlement of dust and soot particles as the temperature cools under the plume of smoke over the Hemel Hempstead area. We would remind residents of messages relayed yesterday that these dust and soot particles are an irritant which can cause coughing, irritation to the eyes and nausea – particularly to elderly, those with existing respiratory problems and young people. Wherever possible, people in the Hemel Hempstead area should continue to ‘go in, stay in and tune in’ to media bulletins and avoid all unnecessary journeys.

Those people who work in the area were also asked to make contact with their own companies and not to go anywhere near the area until advised it was safe to do so.

Warnings were also issued through the media that slowing or stopping to film the ongoing incident on mobile phones or other devices was not only a possible danger to the safety of road users but was also likely to constitute a criminal offence.

At this time, the advice remains to people in the affected area to stay indoors, close windows and watch/listen to news bulletins for updates. This advice is especially relevant to people who have some form of respiratory condition such as asthma or bronchitis.”

It is apparent that there is a strong case for an open and transparent engagement with Canvey Residents, so that it is clear what actual At Risk Register, dangers exist and the responses required of Residents. Being unaware is a Recipe for Panic!

“In COMAH, there is a requirement to share information between
site operators and Category 1 and 2 responders in order to fulfil the requirements
of the duty for risk assessment, warning and informing the public and the
preparation of on-site and off-site emergency plans.”

The argument that keeping Residents in the Dark so as to protect property  prices and encourage further development, is a Reckless Policy!

We are reminded that Castle Point has an ageing population, many Residents can be considered At Risk. There is a need for an At Risk Register. There is a need for an Able to Assist Register.

An Informed Community, can be better Prepared to React and Respond correctly and. those able, be in a position to assist.

However the Castle Point policy; “that continued development is necessary in order that the settlement of Canvey can continue to thrive economically and socially” appears to ignore any possibility that any incident or “accident” could endanger Residents and property, or that there is adequate resources on standby ready to respond to any eventuality without Residents assistance.

Meanwhile Castle Point council have published their new Emergency Response Plan.

We have added a link to the document HERE.

Thorney Question of Over-developing a Small Island in Castle Point!

Given that there is a possibility Canvey Island may suffer another Tidal Flood, given that we may again suffer from Surface Water Flooding as in 2013 and 2014, given that there may be another leak of LPG from Calor Gas, given that OIKOS have been granted permission by CPBC to increase activities in the importation, storage and blending of butane, and however small the risks, should not the Distribution of Housing Growth as imposed by Castle Point Borough Council (cpbc) be called into serious Question? *

Already there are over 38,500 residents on Canvey Island. If there were to be a major incident from just one of these four sources, an Evacuation of the Island, given the population level, the lack of access / egress routes and there being No Means of Warning, would be an impossibility. Is it time to cap the population level? We believe it is!

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Rather than accepting these “dangers” the powers that be at cpbc, appear to have their eyes and ears covered to blot out the concerns of the population on Canvey Island exposed to possible incidents in the desire to offset Housing and Business development away from the controlling mainland part of the Borough. Little wonder there is an active group hoping to convince the Boundary Commission to leave the Borough’s borders alone!

The denial of Climate Change, the absolute faith in our sea defence, the faith in the “hard work” undertaken to “maintain” the Island’s drainage system and the assurances from the two Top Tier COMAH sites, amount to little more than roll off the tongue Platitudes!

We stand accused of scare-mongering, then so be it!

We call it living in the Real World and “facing” realities. Fore-warned is Fore-armed.

Canvey’s highway infrastructure is restrictive, all routes converging at Waterside Roundabout, meaning evacuation is impossible and our limited Fire and Rescue cover means response times for assistance are likely to be prolonged.*

Green Belt is protected in planning terms by the Very Special Circumstances needed before the consideration of any development proposal.

Consider that, against a development proposal within a Flood Risk Zone and within the Consultation Distance of a Major Hazard site!

This is what requires not only for planning considerations, but also leading council members and officers to consider their consciences, with the proposal to develop 113 dwellings at Thorney Bay, Canvey Island.

This is only the first phase of a major development consisting of “approximately 600 dwellings” plus “Park Homes.”

The cpbc planning portal indicates that the developer may have overcome, to cpbc’s satisfaction, the requirements of the HSE, the Environment Agency and Essex County Council, the surface water drainage experts.

However these agencies lifting of Objections should not be seen as them giving their Approval!

In fact their concerns indicate that they Do Not Rule Out the Possibility of one or other Incidents occurring in the Future!

Within their comments they give very distinct warnings and concerns and indicate quite clearly the final decision and the Responsibility is Castle Point council’s ALONE!

Below are a few of the consultee agencies points of concern over the Thorney Bay proposal and further below are links to some previous incidents etc of some interest.

The Environment Agency state;

Our role is to provide you with our assessment of the risk for matters within our remit so that you can make an informed decision

“The FRA (flood risk assessment) proposes no detriment in off-site flood hazard for the design and extreme floods and manages this via a proposed embankment, subject to condition.”  Approval of the design of the proposed embankment is therefore necessary as a pre commencement condition, as the embankment is essential to safeguard against the offsite impacts. Without the construction of the embankment off site impacts would be seen

Provided you consider the development meets the requirements set out in the NPPF, including that it is safe for its lifetime and does not increase the risk of flood risk off site, we request that the following conditions are appended to any permission granted. Without these conditions our objection will be maintained.

Flood Risk Responsibilities for your Council    

We have not considered the following issues as part of this planning application as they are not within our direct remit; nevertheless these are all very important considerations for managing flood risk for this development, and determining the safety and acceptability of the proposal. Prior to deciding this application you should give due consideration to the issues below. It may be that you need to consult relevant experts outside your planning team.     

Safety of the building 

 Safety of People (including the provision and adequacy of an emergency plan, temporary refuge and  rescue or evacuation arrangements) 

Flood recovery measures (including flood proofing and other building level resistance and resilience measures) 

Whether insurance can be gained or not

Sustainability of the development – we advise you consider the sustainability of the development over its lifetime.

Your attention is brought to the proposed Roscommon Way Extension that is likely to pass immediately to the south of this proposed development site. Consideration is required of residual tidal flood risk at a master planning level to evaluate if further proposed phases of the Thorney Bay caravan park development could become less deliverable, unless suitable mitigation measures are identified and designed, with regards to breach characteristics – mainly depth, time to inundation and hazard ratings. Future proposed Flood Risk Vulnerability Classification will need to be considered alongside the residual tidal flood risks to ensure a sequential approach to future site layout is maintained.

 

ECC Lead Local Flood Authority position;

Having reviewed the Flood Risk Assessment and the associated documents which accompanied the planning application, do not object to the granting of planning permission.

Condition 1

 No works shall take place until a detailed surface water drainage scheme for the site, based on sustainable drainage principles and an assessment of the hydrological and hydro geological context of the development, has been submitted to and approved in writing by the local planning authority. The scheme should include but not be limited to:

  • Final modelling and calculations for all areas of the drainage system.
  • A final drainage plan which details exceedance and conveyance routes, FFL and ground levels, and location and sizing of any drainage features.

Reason:

  • To prevent flooding by ensuring the satisfactory storage of/disposal of surface water from the site.
  • To ensure the effective operation of SuDS features over the lifetime of the development.                 
  • To provide mitigation of any environmental harm which may be caused to the local water environment                                                                                                                                                            
  • Failure to provide the above required information before commencement of works may result in a system being installed that is not sufficient to deal with surface water occurring during rainfall events and may lead to increased flood risk and pollution hazard from the site.

Condition 2

 No works shall take place until a scheme to minimise the risk of offsite flooding caused by surface water run-off and groundwater during construction works and prevent pollution has been submitted to, and approved in writing by, the local planning authority.

Reason

 The National Planning Policy Framework paragraph 103 and paragraph 109 state that local planning authorities should ensure development does not increase flood risk elsewhere and does not contribute to water pollution.

 Construction may lead to excess water being discharged from the site. If dewatering takes place to allow for construction to take place below groundwater level, this will cause additional water to be discharged. Furthermore the removal of topsoils during construction may limit the ability of the site to intercept rainfall and may lead to increased runoff rates

Health and Safety Executive state;

More than 10%of the housing development lies within the middle zone, – through the HSE Planning Advice Web App advised Against the granting of Planning Permission.

However, having given more detailed consideration, HSE has concluded that it is appropriate for HSE to provide case-specific advice on this proposal outside of the codified planning methodology provided.

The layout indicates that a total of 30 dwellings at a housing density of 38 dwellings per hectare within the middle zone.

HSE’s advice is that significant housing should be prevented from being built in the inner zone and only a limited number of houses at a low density.

The overall objective is to maintain the separation of incompatible development from the Major Hazard.

HSE would advise Against any planning application which seeks to locate any additional dwellings within the middle zone of Calor Gas Ltd.

Instead of using the HSE Planning Advice Web App, Castle Point Borough Council should therefore consult HSE directly for advice on any future planning applications which propose further residential development at Thorney Bay Park within the middle zone of Calor Gas Ltd.

*Below are links to;

*Reduction in Essex Fire and Rescue Service cover view HERE

*Calor Gas Leak court decision view HERE

*OIKOS permission granted view HERE

Editor. It should be pointed out that any emphasis included in the text is the author’s.

 

Can’t Plan, Won’t Plan – Canvey Island getting into Deep Water over Climate Change?

Despite Canvey Island, being surrounded by water and with a “Complex Drainage System,” the subject of Climate Change is buried as deep as Page 165 in the Castle Point unadopted Draft Local Plan2016!

So far, the list reads; No Local Plan, No Neighbourhood Plan, No Town Centre Regeneration Plan, however, what we do have is a TE2100 Plan (Thames Estuary Plan)!

But a Plan is of Little Use if it has a limited chance of  being implemented!

The Environment Agency consider; “The TE2100 Plan is an aspirational document, rather than a definitive policy, so whether the defences are raised in the future will be dependent on a cost benefit analysis and the required funding becoming available.”

There is No Vehicle in place for the collection of Developer Contributions, put in place by Castle Point Council, towards futures Funding for Sea Defence improvements. In the meantime development continues across Castle Point, including that which increases the level of population at Risk of Flooding!

Given that it appears the Earth’s oceans are warming 13% faster than previously calculated, and many of those in local power appear to be Climate Change sceptics, there is Real cause for Concern.

The effects of Sea Level Rise on the Thames will be dramatic, the protection of London will be the priority. The Thames barrier increases Sea Levels in the Estuary and increases the need for space for water.

Quite probably the future sea defence improvements around Canvey Island will be considered between the value of considerable financial expenditure and a practical experiment into the effectiveness of new space for water schemes along the banks of the Thames Estuary.

This should cause considerable debate as to the sensibility of new large Housing Development being distributed towards Canvey Island, however the Local Plan2016’s indicates the local authority Castle Point’s approach to this Flood risk as “there remains a very small probability that they could be overtopped or breached.”

Those residents who suffered their Homes and Property being flooded by the severe floods of 2013 and 2014 will take little comfort with the draft Local Plan2016’s approach to Surface Water flooding;  “Fluvial flooding is also possible from the watercourses and dykes that form the drainage system on Canvey Island.”

Green House Gas Emissions add to Sea Level Rise, Castle Point contribute to the increase. Within the Local Plan2016 it states;

“The Sustainability Appraisal Scoping Report sets out details of the borough’s ecological footprint. In terms of Castle Point’s impact on Climate Change, it is clear that the borough’s ecological footprint is high and likely to be contributing to more extreme weather events.

Paragraph 93 of the NPPF is clear that planning plays a key role in helping shape places to secure radical reductions in greenhouse gas emissions, minimising vulnerability and providing resilience to the impacts of climate change,”

“The strategy in Castle Point therefore needs to be on how the individual can reduce their ecological footprint, and how developments can be planned to encourage this.

The Transport Evidence for the New Local Plan shows that Castle Point suffers congestion at peak times causing queueing at junctions and extended journey times. Congestion results in increased emissions from vehicles, including emissions of green house gases that contribute towards climate change.

Congestion is therefore contributing to both climate change and poor health outcomes for local people.”

Surface Water Flooding on Canvey Island and the Borough;

“The South Essex Surface Water Management Plan 2012 (SWMP) identifies the causes and locations of surface water flooding in the borough and a strategy for the future management of surface water flood risk, taking into account the impacts of climate change. This indicates that when the impacts of climate change are taken into account the likelihood and potential impacts of surface water flooding will be worse in the future than they are now. Extreme rainfall events will be more common and the depth of flood water will increase posing a risk to more properties.”

This is incorrect and out of date information in regards to Canvey Island. This flawed document was eagerly grasped by Castle Point cabinet as being indication that Surface Water Flood Risk affects Borough wide equally. Events in 2013 and 2014 proved cabinet members and officers so wrong!

The SWMP was based on incorrect Historic evidence that had been un-documented, suggesting there had been NO previously recorded flooding events by cpbc officers, particularly where Canvey Island was concerned.

The SWMP remains amongst the local Plan2016 Evidence base despite being incorrect and having been replaced by the more accurate Canvey Island Integrated Urban Drainage study document, albeit incomplete.

Interestingly the Canvey Island Integrated Urban Drainage study, is NOT included within the Local Plan2016 Evidence Base documents!

This may indicate the level of concern for any future Flooding of Canvey Island by cpbc cabinet in general, something current and future residents may wish to make themselves aware of.

The issue of Flood Risk in the Castle Point Local Plan, whichever version, needs to become more prominent and focussed within the Policies.

Residents Safety, Well-Being and Financial Security deserves far more consideration than is currently apparent.

Castle Point Council deserve more investigation and challenge on their approach to Risk.

More information on the latest Sea Level Rise and Climate Change may wish to follow this link to a MSN News article HERE.

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© CSIRO An Argo float is deployed into the ocean

 

Flood Risk! Canvey Island – The “Special Case,” the Sequential Test and the time to Reconsider!

The Approval of Flats in Canvey Town Centre caused Canvey councillors to mention fears of flooding.

Usually levels of development in areas liable to Flood would be restricted through planning, by consideration of the Sequential Test. This Test proposes that inappropriate development in areas at risk of flooding should be avoided by directing development away from areas at highest risk.

The effect of the policy approach of Castle Point council is to continue to increase the numbers of population at Risk of Flooding on Canvey Island.

CPBC justifies this by suggesting that “Canvey Island is a Distinctive Community. It has specific identified needs in terms of social, economic and physical regeneration, as well as housing.”

The result is that due to the 40% increase in population, since Canvey fell under the control of castle point council, there is a perpetual need for a never ending supply of Housing Development on the Island!

This is regardless that the Need for Housing is calculated as a Borough-wide figure.

The fact that it is admitted that there is “a need to maintain the population living in the flood risk zone at current levels or lower” on Canvey Island, has not deterred a reckless approach to the distribution of Housing Growth by the local authority!

This policy of increasing the numbers of population at Risk of Flooding and the deliberate manipulation of the Sequential Test stems from the efforts to label Canvey Island a “Special Case”!

Echo June 2008

DEVELOPERS seeking to build new homes on Canvey are being forced to think again because of growing fears about flooding.

The Environment Agency is resolutely pursuing its policy of recommending refusal of plans to build new homes on the island because Canvey is below sea level and therefore on a flood plain.

Castle Point Council is taking those recommendations to heart and rejecting applications for new homes, leaving some developers in limbo.

The council has pledged to continue upholding the Environment Agency’s recommendations until the results of a Government-initiated inquiry into flood plains publishes its findings.

The Government appointed Sir Michael Pitt to carry out the study, following catastrophic floods in Hull after heavy rainfall in June and July last year. It is likely the final report expected, this summer, will recommend tighter restrictions.

Ray Howard, Castle Point and Essex county councillor, said local authorities were reluctant to ignore the Environment Agency’s advice, while they are waiting for the results of the Pitt Report.

Mr Howard has received many letters from people struggling to build on Canvey.

He said: “It’s a big problem that needs to be looked at. We can’t have a blanket ban for building here.

“I believe Canvey is unique, as it has the best flood walls and flood water drainage system in the country.

“The flood plain rules should be relaxed for us.”

Last week localised flooding on the island, caused by heavy rainfall, affected hundreds of residents on the island.

But Mr Howard is convinced it is well protected against severe flooding from the Thames Estuary.

A total of £34 million was spent rebuilding Canvey’s sea walls in the 1970s and 1980s.

A further £6 million was spent last year on 14 giant pumps, spread around the island to force water back into the sea if the walls are ever breached.

Mr Howard said: “The reason Canvey is always considered high-risk is because of the 1953 flood.

“But back then the only sea defences were soil walls, built by the original Dutch settlers.”

Despite Mr Howard’s insistence that Canvey is well protected, the Environment Agency refused to budge from its policy of objecting to all new homes on flood plains.

Spokeswoman Rita Penman insisted the Environment Agency could not relax its planning guidelines for Canvey, even for special cases.

She said: “Although Canvey is well defended, the current understanding across the country is that if there are other areas not on the flood plains, they should be developed first.

“This is in the interests of everyone’s safety. We are therefore unable to recommend approval for any new developments on Canvey at the present time.”

Even if the Government report clears the way for new homes on flood plains, insurers are warning hundreds of thousands of homes built in high-risk areas may not qualify for insurance.

Nick Starling, the Association of British Insurers’ director of general insurance and health, said: “Poor planning decisions will lead to more homes becoming unsaleable, uninsurable and uninhabitable”

Consequently in 2007 a Planning committee meeting considered, and were asked to “Note” the freedoms of decision making that were pleaded for, and “seemingly” allowed by the Environment Agency, in considering Canvey a “Special Case” that has led to the abuse of the levels of development we continue to see proposed.

How things have changed, in such a short space of time!

Since then we have received a concerning Strategic Flood Risk Assessment for Canvey Island in 2010, and suffered two Surface Water Flooding Events during 2013 and 2014!

Whether a Planning committee should have the power to approve such a policy with the potential to impact Canvey Island, or whether members were all actually made aware of the policy’s implications, is dubious to say the least.

Whether the 2007 planning committee meeting decision to allow increasing levels of population at Risk should now be re-considered in the light of the ominous Flood Risk Assessment and the Flooding incidents, appears obvious!

Floods 2014

The Full text of the Echo article can be read HERE.

Flooded Canvey Resident? Apathetic or Concerned about Flooding – Flood and Coast Conference

Much has been recorded, not least by ourselves,  regarding Flooding and Canvey Island, so much so that both could be considered synonymous.

References include, our sea defences being the best in the UK, the Surface Water Flooding during 2013 and 2014, “achieving effective drainage is a complicated task”, The flawed Surface Water Management Plan that indicated NO previous recorded flooding incidents on Canvey Island, that residents were allowed to believe that the Island’s drainage pumping system was capable to cope with flooding from Tidal sources, a Strategic Flood Risk Assessment that appeared so onerous that it was quickly removed from the public domain for fear of jeopardising the doomed complete Core Strategy process during 2011, and so on!

canvey flood bid 1.jpg-pwrt3

Little enough Central Government monies are available to improve the situation.

Our position is that, it is wholly unreasonable to increase the size of the population at Risk of Flooding, especially as evidence is clear that it is unlikely ever to be able to guarantee peoples safety. Whilst this is the case, no level of development should be allowed that would increase numbers of people and homes at Risk of Flooding.

Growth for Growth’s sake will only put more strain on the drainage system, as will the accompanying Hard Surface Areas.

In this light, there is a “Flood and Coast” conference in March and Phiala Mehring is participating and asks for your assistance.

She is gathering information about flood risk management to use in her presentation that will also be used in her PhD thesis.

The link following will take you to her simple to follow Questionnaire. If you feel you would like to help and include your Canvey Island flooding experiences or knowledge, please click on this LINK.

Phialia describes her position as an; Advocate of Integrated Flood Risk Management, working with communities.